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Videos from the field

screenshot of Superintendent for Barholomew Consolidated School Corporation, Dr. John Quick, at a Senate HELP Committee Meeting

UDL mentioned at Senate HELP Committee Hearing

During a February 7, 2012 hearing of the U.S. Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee on "The Promise of Accessible Technology," Chairman Senator Harkin and the Superintendent of the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation in Indiana, Dr. Quick, praised UDL’s impact on school outcomes. Listen to the hearing to learn more or read this article about the hearing.


UDL at OCALI

Colorado State University

ACCESS logo - gold cap Best Practices Through Universal Design for Learning


Learn how faculty at Colorado State University are implementing UDL in their classrooms.

 

MERLOT - Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching

Dr. Paul BeckmanUniversal Design for Learning in Information Systems


In this video, Dr. Paul Beckman, a professor in the Information Systems Department in the College of Business at San Francisco State University, describes an experiment that he conducted with two sections of his Business 782 course. In one section, he applied UDL; in the other section, he did not. Find out what he discovered!

 

Be sure to check out the other videos related to this case story: “Why implement UDL?,” “Teaching Methods,” and “Conclusion.”

 

 

 

Images of Dr. Yang and her studentsUDL for Introduction to Music, Dr. Sandra Yang


In this collection of videos, Dr. Sandra Yang, Music Professor at Cal Poly Pomona, describes how she applies UDL to her Introduction to Music course. Click on any one of the circles to learn more!

 

 

 

Dr. Wilson at a pianoUniversal Design for Learning in Music Theory


Dr. Brian Wilson, Music Professor at Sonoma State University, shares the benefits of incorporating UDL into his Music Theory and Composition courses.

 

Be sure to check out the other videos/tools related to this case story: “Brian’s Story,” “Personal Impact,” and “Resources.”

 

 

 

Dr. Wo talking with studentsUniversal Design for Learning in English Education


In this video, Dr. Chingling Wo, a faculty member in the Department of English at Sonoma State University, discusses the benefits of applying UDL to her courses. Her students add in their perspectives as well!

 

Be sure to check out the other videos/resources related to this case story: “Chingling’s UDL Story,” “Chingling’s FLC Process, “ and “UDL – Support Resources.”

 

 

 

Dr. Ely working with a studentUDL in Business Education


Dr. Kirsten Ely, professor at Sonoma State University, and her students discuss how UDL is used to address students’ different learning styles in her courses.

 

Be sure to check out the other videos related to this case story: “Kristen’s UDL Story,” “Kristen’s UDL Process,” and “UDL – Support Resources.”

 

 

 

Dr. Roberts talking with studentsUniversal Design for Learning in Nursing Education


Dr. Deborah Roberts, Professor of Nursing at Sonoma State University, shares the insights that she gained from joining a Learning Community on UDL.

 

Be sure to check out the other videos/resources related to this case story: “Deborah’s Story” and “Support Resources.”

 

 

 

Designing Accessibility vs. Accommodating Disability - title screenUsing Technology to Foster UD


In this video, Dr. Bill Vicars, who teaches courses on American Sign Language and Deaf Studies at California State University Sacramento, discusses the importance of designing courses that are accessible to all students.

 

Be sure to check out the other videos/resources related to this case story: “Bill’s Story” and “Bill’s Tools.”

 

 

 

Dr. Bao teaching a statistics classUDL in Elementary Statistics


In this video, Dr. David Bao, Professor and Chair of the Mathematics Department at San Francisco State University, describes how UDL has impacted his teaching philosophy.

 

Be sure to check out the Reference Materials as well!

 

 

Universal Postsecondary Support and Instruction Design for Equalization (U.P.S.I.D.E.)

Dawn Tamarkin in her biology classroom Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education Biology Examples


In this video, watch how Dr. Dawn Tamarkin, Professor of Biology at Springfield Technical Community College in Springfield, MA, incorporates UDL principles into her Introductory Biology course.

 

Why UDL? Dr. Tamarkin realizes that using a microscope to examine cells may pose a barrier for some of her students. She creates “tactile cells” in order to make examining cells through a microscope more accessible to her students who have visual impairments or who have difficulty physically manipulating the microscope. However, she realizes that these "tactile cells" benefit all of the students in her class!

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 1.3: Options that provide alternatives for visual information.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 4.1: Options in the mode of physical response.

 

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)

Purple intro screen of "AIMing for Achievement"AIMing for Achievement DVD trailer


"The AIMing for Achievement DVD includes content on a variety of topics that are important to the provision, selection, acquisition, and use of accessible instructional materials...The DVD contains interviews, supplementary information, and illustrative scenarios that increase awareness and knowledge that support timely provision of accessible instructional materials to students who need them for educational participation and achievement, including legal issues, a student-centered decision-making process, an overview of specialized formats, a review of multiple sources from which to acquire specialized formats, and an overview of which students can receive materials from each source, as well as detailed discussions about technology and other supports for using accessible instructional materials."

 

Why UDL? UDL Guidelines highlight the importance of providing students with options for perception as well as options for physcial action. This DVD provides a wealth of information on how Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) reduce barriers to curricular content for students with print-disabilities.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of "providing options for perception" and "providing options for physical action":  

Tufts University

Group of students working together to solve a problem Tufts' Boston Arts Academy Day of Engineering


Tufts University and Boston Arts Academy team up for a day of engineering and art.  Organized through collaboration between Tufts School of Engineering and its M.A.T. program, BAA 9th graders spend one day each spring at Tufts making connections between the performing arts with the concepts introduced in the Museum of Science Engineering curriculum that the students have recently completed.

 

Why UDL? "Illustrating key concepts non-linguistically" is a valuable UDL practice. In this video, watch to see how concepts in design are expressed through dance and theater.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 2.5: Options that illustrate key concepts non-linguistically.

 

Doing What Works

Doing What Works logo with a magnifying glass Monitoring the Reading Progress of English Learners


This video gives an overview of the beginning reading skills that need to be assessed. 

 

Why UDL? The UDL Guidelines stress the importance of monitoring students' progress. This video highlights ways to monitor students' beginning reading skills.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 6.4: Options that enhance capacity for monitoring progress.

 

 

 

 Doing What Works logo with a magnifying glass Teaching Academic English to English Language Learners


This video highlights the importance of explicitly teaching academic English to English Language Learners.

 

Why UDL? "Promoting cross-linguistic understanding" is a valuable UDL practice. This video offers examples as to how to support students’ vocabulary and grammar development around specific content areas.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 2.4: Options that promote cross-linguistic understanding.

 

 

 

Doing What Works logo with a magnifying glass Teaching Vocabulary to English Language Learners


This video offers an overview of strategies to develop students’ vocabulary.

 

Why UDL? "Providing options that define vocabulary and symbols" for students is a valuable UDL strategy. This video shows concrete examples of developing students' vocabulary skills.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 2.1: Options that define vocabulary and symbols.

Innovative Teachers Network

Teacher presenting her assessmentIndustrial Revolution Tic Tac Toe


Learn how two teachers from Columbus East High School in Columbus, IN created a unique way for students to choose projects on the Industrial Revolution. These teachers won the U.S. Innovative Teachers Forum and went on to the Microsoft Worldwide Innovative Teachers Forum in Brazil to represent the United States.

 

Why UDL? The UDL Guidelines highlight the importance of providing students with individual choice. Industrial Revolution Tic Tac Toe encourages students to choose from different projects in order to increase student creativity and engagement.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 7.1: Options that increase individual choice and autonomy.

 

NPR

A paralyzed graffiti artist is creating an image that says 'Tempt' with a special computer monitor screen. Paralyzed Graffiti Artist Draws with his Eyes


Watch this video to see how Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Tony Quan uses a tool called "The Eye Writer" to create art using his eyes rather than his hands.

 

Why UDL? The UDL Guidelines emphasize the importance of providing "options for physical response." "The Eye Writer" allows students who have weaknesses in motor skills to create art through eye movements.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 4.1 Options in the mode of physical response.

Film Trailers

Darius Goes West DVD cover with open sky and mountainsDarius Goes West


“Accompanied by his eleven best friends, Darius Weems, a fifteen-year-old living with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), leaves home for the first time in his life. The rowdy crew sets a course for California where they hope to convince MTV to customize Darius's wheelchair on the hit show, Pimp My Ride. Darius Goes West has been enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of people of all ages all around the world.”

 

Why UDL? Among many themes, this documentary highlights the importance of all individuals having physical access to their surroundings and to their communities. Although UDL is a framework that goes beyond access and focuses on learning, this film provides convincing examples of the need for Universal Design (UD).

 

Darius Goes West has grown into much more than just a film! Check out the website: http://www.dariusgoeswest.org/

 

 

 

Samuel flying a planeIncluding Samuel


“Before his son Samuel was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, photojournalist Dan Habib rarely thought about the inclusion of people with disabilities. Now he thinks about inclusion every day. Shot and produced over four years, Habib’s award-winning documentary film, Including Samuel, chronicles the Habib family’s efforts to include Samuel in every facet of their lives. The film honestly portrays his family’s hopes and struggles as well as the experiences of four other individuals with disabilities and their families. Including Samuel is a highly personal, passionately photographed film that captures the cultural and systemic barriers to inclusion.

 

Why UDL? The film’s strong message of inclusion resonates with the goals of UDL – to reduce barriers and maximize learning opportunities for all students.

 

To learn more about the film and professional development offerings, visit their website: http://www.includingsamuel.com/home.aspx

 

 

 

Children in a classroomWilling and Able


“The film observes the everyday lives of an extraordinary community at a Boston Public School in the Dorchester neighborhood. It is clear that this is a special place. The film attempts to present the ways that the staff and parents create a caring, supportive environment for the children….It isn’t easy. But it isn’t impossible, either. It’s real life. And that’s the revelation.”

 

Why UDL? "Willing and Able" highlights a school community's dedication to reducing barriers to the curriculum and to fostering an inclusive, supportive learning environment for all of its students.

 

Learn more about the film at: http://www.willingandablefilm.com/willingandablefilm/Home.html

 

 

Kent Intermediate School District (Kent ISD)

The following videos were created by a group of teachers from Kent Intermediate School District in Grand Rapids, MI. As part of the district's professional development, teachers were asked to break into groups and identify UDL strategies that they currently use in their classrooms or strategies that they discovered through their groups' investigations. The teachers then reported out to the larger group, making sure to incorporate UDL into the design of their presentations as well!  

 

Group of teachers in a discussionUDL Guidelines Presentation Pillar 1

 

Watch different groups of teachers discuss how they can implement the guidelines suggested from UDL Principle I, "Provide Multiple Means of Representation." The teachers discuss specific strategies and tools for implementation.

 

Green screen with the words "Provide options for physical action"UDL Guidelines Presentation Pillar 2


This video was created by a group of teachers in order to explain their perspectives on UDL Principle II, "Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression." The teachers offer some great examples of how they implement the guidelines suggested for this principle into their classrooms!

 

Image of a chalkboard with ideas for providing "CHOICE and Autonomy"UDL Guidelines Presentation Pillar 3


Watch this video to learn how a group of teachers interpret UDL Principle III, "Provide Multiple Means of Engagement." The teachers share their ideas on ways to implement the guidelines suggested for this principle into your classroom!

 

Edutopia

Photo of students demonstrating alternate forms of action and expressionHow to Teach Math as a Social Activity


Watch this video for a great example of UDL in a classroom that requires no technology. A teacher in Anchorage, AK demonstrates his strategies for creating a collaborative environment for learning.

 

Why UDL? Fostering collaboration and communication is an important UDL strategy. Watch students share ideas, practice discussion, provide constructive feedback, and work in groups.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 8.3: Options that foster collaboration and communication.

 

 

 

The word "Arts" spelled out with different itemsMusic and Dance Drive Academic Achievement


Watch this video to see an example of arts integration to promote academic achievement. Opening Minds Through the Arts (OMA) is a student-achievement program that uses music, dance, and visual arts to teach skills used in reading, writing, math, science, and other subjects.

 

Why UDL? Providing options for language and symbols is a key UDL practice. In this video, pay special attention to how arts integration benefits English Language Learners. Also note how content is being conveyed to students in multiple ways; the dance lesson reinforces mathematical concepts by asking students to make shapes with their bodies. 

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 2.4: Options that promote cross-linguistic understanding.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 2.5: Options that illustrate key concepts non-linguistically.

 

 

 

Student displaying his artworkStudents Learn to Make a Difference


Watch this video of 7th graders at ASCEND School in Oakland, CA.  Their study of the conflict in Iraq as the war began in 2003 led to in-depth understanding of the war and the emergence of critical thinking skills in the face of complex, real, ongoing issues. Students communicated with pen pals in Iraq and staged a public demonstration in support of these friends.  This peaceful protest won the attention of media around the world.

 

Why UDL? The UDL Guidelines stress the importance of making learning relevant to students' lives. By focusing on an issue that is meaningful to the ASCEND students, deeper, more authentic learning takes place.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 7.2: Options that enhance relevance, value, and authenticity.

 

 

 

Students working at a deskAcademics Meets Architecture: Applying Math Skills to a Real World Problem


Geometry students at Mountlake Terrace High School design a state of the art high school for 2050 in teams as a culminating project.  Students receive guidance and feedback from a local architect who eventually judges the students' projects.

 

Why UDL? Connecting learning to students' own lives is an important UDL strategy. Relevance, value, and authenticity are enhanced for these high school students by developing their math skills through a real world problem.

 

Plus sign icon

Find more examples of Checkpoint 7.2: Options that enhance relevance, value, and authenticity.

 

 

Student in science classAn Introduction to Integrated Studies


Students at the Ferryway School take part in a waterworks project that spans their Science, Social Studies, Science, Math, and English classes.


 

Why UDL? The UDL Guidelines stress the importance of making learning relevant to students' lives. The integrated approach of this curriculum design provides for more relevant, authentic student learning.

 

Plus sign icon

Find more examples of Checkpoint 7.2: Options that enhance relevance, value, and authenticity.

 

 

 

Students dressed as pilotsBeginning the Journey: Five Year Olds Drive Their Own PBL Projects


Five-year old students at the Auburn Early Education Center in Auburn, Arkansas take part in a theme-based curriculum that is grounded in authentic learning experiences.  See low tech and high tech examples that Auburn teachers use to enhance the relevance of their lessons.

 

Why UDL? Connecting learning to students' own lives is an important UDL strategy. The project-based curriculum at the Auburn Early Education Center generates authentic, real purposes for learning.

 

Plus sign icon

Find more examples of Checkpoint 7.2: Options that enhance relevance, value, and authenticity.

 

 

Sheldon BermanSuperintendent Sheldon Berman Builds a Network of Caring School Communities


Dr. Berman discusses the far reaching impact a positive school culture can have upon student learning.

 

Why UDL? Reducing threats and distractions is a key UDL strategy. In this video, Dr. Berman emphasizes the importance of creating schools in which students feel safe.

 

Plus sign icon

Find more examples of Checkpoint 7.3: Options that reduce threats and distractions.

 

 

 

 

 

Group of studentsPeace Helpers: PS-24 Brooklyn, NY


Students practice conflict resolution and peer mediation at a K-5 school in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Why UDL? Fostering collaboration and communication is an important UDL strategy. The peer mediation and conflict resolution activities featured in this video are great examples of building a community across grade levels.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 8.3: Options that foster collaboration and communication.

 

 

 

Group of students working togetherStudent Mentors Teach Game Design


Advanced high school students serve as mentors, teaching younger students the fundamentals of game design as part of McKinley School's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math program).

 

Why UDL? Fostering collaboration and communication is an important UDL strategy. In this video, see how student mentors gain confidence and reinforce their skills by teaching others and see how younger students benefit from individualized coaching.

 

Plus sign iconFind more examples of Checkpoint 8.3: Options that foster collaboration and communication.

 



Last Updated: 08/13/2014

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