Implementation

Be the change

UDL Guidelines - Version 2.0: Examples and Resources

Checkpoint 4.1: Vary the methods for response and navigation

II. Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression

Physical Action

Key Considerations

  • How does this help learners meet the goal?
  • How does this account for the variability of all learners?
  • Can the learner navigate their physical environment?

udlcenter [at] udlcenter [dot] org (Can you think of other examples/resources that illustrate this checkpoint? Tell us!)

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Example/Resource Why UDL?
A red and gray Camera Mouse logo

Camera Mouse

Camera Mouse is a free program that enables you to control the mouse pointer on your computer screen just by moving your head.

Be sure to check out the informational video on the website!

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Windows 7, Vista, or XP computer and a webcam

Why UDL? Controlling the mouse pointer with your head instead of your hand is a perfect example of providing options for physical response.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

A paralyzed graffiti artist is creating an image that says 'Tempt' with a special computer monitor screen.

Paralyzed Graffiti Artist Draws With His Eyes

Watch this video to see how Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Tony Quan uses a tool called "The Eye Writer" to create art using his eyes rather than his hands.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free to view video; Eye Writer estimated to be sold for around $50 once development is completed
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Creating art with eye movements is a great example of providing options for physical response.

Dawn Tamarkin in her biology classroom

UDL in Higher Education Biology Examples

In this video, watch how Dr. Dawn Tamarkin, Professor of Biology at Springfield Technical Community College in Springfield, MA, incorporates UDL principles into her Introductory Biology course.

Age Group: This is an example from higher education, but this strategy can be used across grade levels
Content Area: Biology
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Dr. Tamarkin creates “tactile cells” in order to make examining cells through a microscope more accessible to all of her students. Students with motor weaknesses may have difficulty manipulating a microscope, and these "tactile cells" are excellent examples of "providing options in the mode of physical response."

See also:
1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

A picture of a keyboard

No Keys Virtual Keyboard

No-Keys is a computer software program that displays an on screen keyboard, also known as a virtual keyboard (a picture of a computer keyboard on the screen). Users can "type" on this onscreen keyboard using a mouse, trackball, or similar pointing device.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000/XP/Vista or later

Why UDL? The different options for "typing" (mouse, trackball, etc.) are great examples of options in the mode of physical response.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

The Microsoft logo with 'Accessibility' underneath it

Microsoft Accessibility Options

Use this tutorial to learn more about free accessibility options that are built into frequently used Microsoft applications.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? The options described in the tutorial, such as StickyKeys, MouseKeys, FilterKeys, and selecting cursor size and color options are excellent examples of providing options in the mode of response.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

An orange and white Tech Matrix logo with a blue globe

TechMatrix

The TechMatrix is a powerful tool for finding educational and assistive technology products for students.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Use the TechMatrix search engine as a resource to find the assistive technologies that provide options in the mode of physical action.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

A yellow butterfly and black texts with a gray background that reads Better Living Through Technology

Switch Scanning Methods

Better Living Through Technology offers online animation examples of the different switch scanning systems available.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Switches offer an alternative method to provide students' input into a computer or other media.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

A keyboard with different flags, showing Click-n-Type is available in multiple=

Click-N-Type

Click-N-Type is an on-screen virtual keyboard designed for individuals who have difficulty typing on a physical computer keyboard.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All areas
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? A virtual computer provides an alternative to a traditional keyboard to which some students with physical disabilities may not have access.

See also:
4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

Students and a teacher working on a computer

AIM Navigator

"The AIM Navigator is a free tool that facilitates the process of decision-making around accessible instructional materials for an individual student. The four major decision points in the process include 1) determination of need, 2) selection of format(s), 3) acquisition of formats; and 4) selection of supports for use. The AIM Navigator includes guiding questions, information that informs decision-making, and useful resources for each decision point."

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? AIM are specialized formats of curricular content that can be used by and students with print-disabilities. They include formats such as Braille, audio, large print, and electronic text. The audio and the electronic text formats are excellent examples of providing options in the mode of physical response for students who have difficulty turning pages or holding a book.

See also:
1.1: Offer ways of customizing the display of information

1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

2.3 Support decoding of text, mathematical notation, and symbols

4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

 

AIM logo - blue hexagon, orange octagon, green circle

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)

This site serves as a resource to state- and district-level educators, parents, publishers, conversion houses, accessible media producers, and others interested in learning more about and implementing AIM and NIMAS.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection to access the website

Why UDL? AIM are specialized formats of curricular content that can be used by and students with print-disabilities. They include formats such as Braille, audio, large print, and electronic text. The audio and the electronic text formats are excellent examples of providing options in the mode of physical response for students who have difficulty turning pages or holding a book.

See also:
1.1: Offer ways of customizing the display of information

1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

2.3 Support decoding of text, mathematical notation, and symbols

4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

Last Updated: 07/22/2015

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