Implementation

Be the change

UDL Guidelines - Version 2.0: Examples and Resources

Checkpoint 1.1: Offer ways of customizing the display of information

I. Provide Multiple Means of Representation

Perception

Key Considerations

  • How does this help learners meet the goal?
  • How does this account for the variability of all learners?
  • Can learners customize the display?

udlcenter [at] udlcenter [dot] org (Can you think of other examples/resources that illustrate this checkpoint? Tell us!)

Diigo logoSearch these examples and resources on Diigo!

Example/Resource Why UDL?
Screen within the Explorer that allows you to choose voice and speed

AIM Explorer

"The AIM Explorer is a free simulation that combines grade-leveled digital text with access features common to most text readers and other supported reading software. Magnification, custom text and background colors, text-to-speech (synthetic and human), text highlighting, and layout options are presented in a logical sequence to help struggling readers decide which of these supports might help them to access and understand text."

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection to download; once downloaded, application can be used with or without an Internet connection

Why UDL? The AIM Explorer allows users to explore their preferences for customizable features such as: magnification, text and background colors, and layout, TtS voice and speed, and more

See also:
1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

2.3: Support decoding of text, mathematical notation, and symbols

 

Images that show effective contrast versus ineffective contrast

Effective Color Contrast

Learn how to customize the display of information for individuals with visual impairments. This website includes examples that illustrate how hue, lightness, and saturation impact visual perception.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Flexibility of color and contrast is a great example of customizing the display of information so that it is accessible to a broader range of users.

 Zen Garden logo

Zen Garden

Zen Garden demonstrates the flexibility of digital media when customizing the display of information.  See the same content presented in varied formats, and design your own page and contribute to the growing collection.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Zen Garden is an example of the flexibility of digital media.  From page to page, the content remains the same; however, the layout is completely different!
Letterpop logo

APH Educational Research

J. Elaine Kitchel from the American Printing House for the Blind outlines guidelines for large print text including appropriate size, color, spacing, and the benefits of APH font.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? The Large Print Guidelines describe the importance of flexible size, color, spacing, and font - features that are essential to consider when customizing the display of information.

Readability logo

Readability

Readability is a simple tool that makes reading on the web more enjoyable by removing the clutter around what you're reading.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? Readability allows the user to customize the display of information by reducing visual distractions that surround written text on the web. 

See also:
3.2: Highlight patterns, critical features, big ideas, and relationships

7.3: Minimize threats and distractions

AIM logo - blue hexagon, orange octagon, green circle

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)

This site serves as a resource to state- and district-level educators, parents, publishers, conversion houses, accessible media producers, and others interested in learning more about and implementing AIM and NIMAS.

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? AIM are specialized formats of curricular content that can be used by and students with print-disabilities. They include formats such as Braille, audio, large print, and electronic text. These multiple formats are excellent examples of providing options that customize the display of information.

See also:
1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

2.3 Support decoding of text, mathematical notation, and symbols

4.1: Vary the methods for response and navigation

4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

Students and a teacher working on a computer

AIM Navigator

"The AIM Navigator is a free tool that facilitates the process of decision-making around accessible instructional materials for an individual student. The four major decision points in the process include 1) determination of need, 2) selection of format(s), 3) acquisition of formats; and 4) selection of supports for use. The AIM Navigator includes guiding questions, information that informs decision-making, and useful resources for each decision point."

Age Group: All ages
Content Area: All content
Cost: Free
Technology Involved: Internet connection

Why UDL? AIM are specialized formats of curricular content that can be used by and students with print-disabilities. They include formats such as Braille, audio, large print, and electronic text. These multiple formats are excellent examples of providing options that customize the display of information.

See also:
1.3: Offer alternatives for visual information

2.3: Support decoding of text, mathematical notation, and symbols

4.1: Vary the methods for response and navigation

4.2: Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies

Last Updated: 01/03/2012

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