Advocacy

Call for change

National UDL Task Force logoNational UDL Task Force

Comprised of more than 40 organizations, the National UDL Task Force advocates support for UDL in federal, state, and district education policy.

Learn more about the National UDL Task Force.

National UDL Call for New Members

Opens new windowNational UDL New Members Flyer (Word)

Opens new windowNational UDL New Members Flyer (PDF)

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UDL Teacher Preparation Tool

CEEDAR logo

The CEEDAR Center, a national technical assistance center, published a tool focused on UDL and teacher preparation and certification. To get a copy go to the Center's UDL Recommendations for Teacher Preparation and Professional Development document.

National Center and State Collaborative

ncsc logoNational Center and State Collaborative (NCSC) has created a set of instructional resources for educators and parents including a crosswalk aligning the Common Core State Standards, college and career readiness/alternate achievement standards, and UDL. For more information, review the following document (PDF): UDL and NCSC Alternative Assessment and Instructional Resources.


SETDA Accessibility Policy Brief

SETDA logo The State Educational Directors of Technology Association (SEDTA), in conjunction with Education Counsel LLC, has released a timely publication that promotes the use of universal design for learning. The publication, The Accessibility of Learning Content for All Students, Including Students with Disabilities, Must be Addressed in the Shift to Digital Instructional Materials, is available for downloading from the SEDTA web site in PDF format.

UDL Task Force News

Photo of the U.S. Capitol BuildingUDL Task Force takes action—To promote UDL in federal policy, the National UDL Task Force recently submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Education and Congress. The Task Force called on the Department to include UDL as a 2015 funding priority. Read the letter to the Department. The Task Force also asked Congress to remove the definition for universal design from the Higher Education Act (HEA) because its definition appears in the Assistive Technology Act. Including universal design in the section of the HEA that defines UDL confuses rather than clarifies understanding of UDL. Read the letter to Congress.


Last Updated: 12/16/2014

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